Sunday, January 25, 2009

Sample of a few grocery items and the cost here in Lagos

I ran out of cereal so I made a trip to Goodies Supermarket to pick some up, along with any other items that might catch my eye. I ended up spending $10 on cereal, $6 on Crystal Light (4-pack) and $5 on Nesquik chocolate drink mix.
To determine the US$ equivalent, I used the current exchange rate of 150 Naira to the US dollar. A few months back the exchange rate was about 120 Naira to the US dollar. If I bought these items a few months ago it would have set me back $26, but this week it set me back a whopping $21. I think this would have cost about $14 if I had bought it in the US.
This grocery chain is owned by some Lebanese people. I sure wish my money was going into the hands of Nigerians!

7 comments:

IamMBB said...

Rachel and I went to the grocery store so I checked and Special K in Aspen = $4.29.

Lisa said...

And you thought Aspen was expensive ; )

Dave & Suzanne said...

You are right about prices - I pay almost $1000 Naira, (at Goodies) for a box of PopTarts every week for Dave!
Take care,
Suzanne

Patrick Egwu said...

Lol...... I believe you guys are going to the wrong place. Goodies is too expensive. Have you tried Shoprite, or some of the corner stores 'run' by Nigerians?

http://www.patrickegwu.blogspot.com/

lara said...

Agree with Patrick. Park n shop is slightly less expensive...for nigerian owned stores however, you might check out Okoli in Dolphin Estate, Ikoyi

Kellenne Okonkwo said...

My Dear I feel your pain. I spent months in Nigeria with my husbands family and to my dismay the prices were outrageous. They cost the same at the local markets as well because they are imported goods. That is why we are preparing to open a distribution warehouse in Lagos like Costco or Sams Club. It will be owned by Nigerians and African Americans. We will drive the cost down by selling bulk to members

TOps said...

The Indians/Lebanese that own these companies are mostly Nigerian Residents and Citizens. Rest assured that the money stays in Nigeria.